Tony Maycock


‘I am now approaching my 72nd birthday, and from the time I was about 13 I suffered with what is now called depression. In 1974 I was wrongly diagnosed as being manic depressive, and in 1978 I was medically retired, having had two spells in a mental hospital.

The treatments from the hospital levelled my mood at absolute despair, never having any ‘good’ periods at all, and after three years I abandoned the drugs for herbal treatments which worked for some of the time. When things got too bad my GP gave me small doses of an anti-depressant which helped make life just about bearable, but I was never entirely free of depression.

From the age of 15 I had been aware that my side vision was reducing, but none of the opticians I went to took any notice of my complaints, being more interested in prescribing more new glasses, which were difficult to afford. Eventually in 1996 I shouted at the optician and she referred me back to my GP, who immediately referred me to our local hospital, which ignored my requests for certain weeks to be excluded from appointments (I used to stay with friends for a week at a time to give my wife a little relief) and it took almost six months before I received an initial appointment, and two more weeks before I had a field of vision test (the first ever for me). Within five minutes of that test the Consultant had diagnosed a Pituitary Adenoma, and within a week I had had a CAT-scan, and was referred to a surgeon. A month later I was seen and a week later I had been operated on. Reading about the Pituitary Foundation in The Times, I contacted them and joined the local support group. I began to read learned papers on the Pituitary gland, and read that an adenoma could cause a form of depression very similar to manic depression.
In The Times of 200(3) I read an article about EPA and research done, and the help that it gave to people with depression. I contacted Igennus but no supplies of Vegepa were available, and I had to wait a few weeks. The warning was given that it could take up to 3 months for the effects to be felt.

When the capsules arrived, I started on the recommended dose of four a day, and within 3 weeks, I was no longer depressed. Until I could not afford Vegepa and went onto omega-3 fish oils, the depression did not occur, but I soon became depressed again on omega-3, and I returned to Vegepa and again the depression has gone. I know I am not cured, but the symptoms are never present now, in spite of having had Prostate cancer, quadruple bypasses,
only half of my left lung working, and being disabled in mobility, hearing and sight. When a friend asked me how I was, soon after starting Vegepa, it was good to reply, ‘Well, it’s nice to feel ill without being depressed’.I am now approaching my 72nd birthday, and from the time I was about 13 I suffered with what is now called depression. In 1974 I was wrongly diagnosed as being manic depressive, and in 1978 I was medically retired, having had two spells in a mental hospital.

The treatments from the hospital levelled my mood at absolute despair, never having any ‘good’ periods at all, and after three years I abandoned the drugs for herbal treatments which worked for some of the time. When things got too bad my GP gave me small doses of an anti-depressant which helped make life just about bearable, but I was never entirely free of depression.

From the age of 15 I had been aware that my side vision was reducing, but none of the opticians I went to took any notice of my complaints, being more interested in prescribing more new glasses, which were difficult to afford. Eventually in 1996 I shouted at the optician and she referred me back to my GP, who immediately referred me to our local hospital, which ignored my requests for certain weeks to be excluded from appointments (I used to stay with friends for a week at a time to give my wife a little relief) and it took almost six months before I received an initial appointment, and two more weeks before I had a field of vision test (the first ever for me). Within five minutes of that test the Consultant had diagnosed a Pituitary Adenoma, and within a week I had had a CAT-scan, and was referred to a surgeon. A month later I was seen and a week later I had been operated on. Reading about the Pituitary Foundation in The Times, I contacted them and joined the local support group. I began to read learned papers on the Pituitary gland, and read that an adenoma could cause a form of depression very similar to manic depression.
In The Times of 200(3) I read an article about EPA and research done, and the help that it gave to people with depression. I contacted Igennus but no supplies of Vegepa were available, and I had to wait a few weeks. The warning was given that it could take up to 3 months for the effects to be felt.

When the capsules arrived, I started on the recommended dose of four a day, and within 3 weeks, I was no longer depressed. Until I could not afford Vegepa and went onto omega-3 fish oils, the depression did not occur, but I soon became depressed again on omega-3, and I returned to Vegepa and again the depression has gone. I know I am not cured, but the symptoms are never present now, in spite of having had Prostate cancer, quadruple bypasses,
only half of my left lung working, and being disabled in mobility, hearing and sight. When a friend asked me how I was, soon after starting Vegepa, it was good to reply, ‘Well, it’s nice to feel ill without being depressed’.

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Stuart Morris I.I.H.H.T dip, www.wonderfullywell.com
M. Staines, Surrey